Russia Postal Code



Russia Postal Code


Russian Post uses a postal code system  that is dependent on the federal subject in which a location is located. Each postal code is six numbers long, with the first three digits indicating the federal subject or special administrative division. Numerous three-digit prefixes are used for certain major themes. For example, Moscow's postal codes vary from 101 to 129.


Greater cities/towns have a "pochta" (Russian: отa, derived from German Postamt), or central post office, which is allocated the city's primary postal code. For example, the postal code for Moscow's pochtamt is 101000. In a large city, a single street may have many postal codes; for example, in Saint Petersburg (which has postal codes ranging from 190 to 199), Kirochnaya Street has the following postal codes: 191028, 191123, 191124, 191015, and 191014, which are all based on house numbers.


Postcodes in Russia: Upper image: The space in the bottom left corner of the envelope to be filled with the six-digit postal code. Bottom image: an example of digits printed on the envelope's back.
In Russia, postal codes are six digits in length. To aid with machine reading, envelopes are printed with a nine-segment outline for each digit that the sender must complete. This is not required, and the postal code can be typed in the same manner as in any other nation. Typically, the code indicates the post office.


Russia's postal codes are totally compatible and non-overlapping with those of Belarus.

What is Russia address format?

Gusev Ivan


ul. Pobedy, d. 20, kv. 29
pos. Oktyabrskiy
Borskiy r-n
Nizhegorodskaya obli
606480
RUSSIA


What is Russia Zipcode Format?
Postal Codes formatting