Ireland Postal Code



Ireland Postal Code ( The Eircode )


The Irish government announced the implementation of an uniform startup system for the entire country on January 1, 2008. Irish Post initially resisted the introduction, claiming that it did not require a new system. The launch was postponed several times before ultimately beginning in 2015. The "Eircode," the official name for the Irish ZIP code, is similar to the system used in the United Kingdom. An alphanumeric sequence is also used in the Irish system. Since its inception, this technique has been the subject of various criticisms: while the first four positions of the seven-point code (the "Routing Key") indicate the mail destination areas, the next four positions (the "Unique Identifier") are chosen at random. As a result, it is possible that the neighbour gets misled by an entirely different Eircode. Eircode, unlike other postal systems, does not employ mailboxes. Because Eircode's claim was to provide consistent CAP over the entire country, the new system had to be employed in major cities as well. Before the Eircode, Dublin's capital, for example, used the simple ZIP code to correspond to the city's 22 districts. These were then incorporated into Eircode. D01-D022 refers to numbered districts. Be careful not to be misled: at some addresses, the district number is simply appended to the end of the address (ex.: Dublin 2).


Try it out for yourself!


Until 2015, if you wanted to ship something to the prestigious Trinity College of Dublin, which is located in Dublin's second district, your address (without the Eircode) looked like this:


Trinity College Dublin, University College Dublin, College Green Dublin 2 IRELAND

Postal Stamp

Postal Codes formatting
What is Ireland address format?

The Shelbourne Hotel
27 St Stephen'S Green
Dublin 2
D02 H529


Ireland

What is Ireland Zipcode Format?
Postal Codes formatting